Wiederstandsnest Tunnel – (Clarence Battery)

This site provides commanding views from Castle Cornet on one side down to St Sampson at the north and all the way down the east coast to Jerbourg point. It also commands the shipping lane to St Peter Port Harbour. As with many existing fortifications the Germans added to the existing structures.

View from the far end. Looking towards Herm  © Nick Le Huray

It is currently only accessible from the cliff path at the top due to the steps at La Vallette having collapsed due to a land slide. If you want to be able to park to access it I suggest that you park in the car park at the bottom of Fort George which is at the top left of the map below.

There is a great analysis of the site on the link below which tells the story of it during the war. I thought it still merited sharing a few photos and details of access to the site here. Particularity as some people may not be able to visit.

The photo below shows you the access to the cliff path from approximately 100 metres from the car park.

 © Nick Le Huray
After the steps turn right and follow the path around the walls of the Fort.  © Nick Le Huray
The cliff path is a little uneven with some steps. Photo © Nick Le Huray
There are some steps. Photo © Nick Le Huray
The history of the Clarence Battery  photo © Nick Le Huray
The entrance to the Battery and the path that is blocked off. photo © Nick Le Huray
The entrance photo © Nick Le Huray
Photo © Nick Le Huray
Photo © Nick Le Huray
View along the coast to Jerbourg. Photo © Nick Le Huray
Looking towards Fort George. Photo © Nick Le Huray
Photo © Nick Le Huray
Photo © Nick Le Huray
Observation and Machine Gun Post. Photo © Nick Le Huray
Photo © Nick Le Huray
Photo © Nick Le Huray
What is left of a 3.7cm gun position Photo © Nick Le Huray
View from the far end of the Battery looking towards Fort George. Photo © Nick Le Huray
Photo © Nick Le Huray
Remains of a 3.7cm anti aircraft gun Photo © Nick Le Huray
Remains of a 3.7cm anti aircraft gun Photo © Nick Le Huray
Remains of a 3.7cm anti aircraft gun Photo © Nick Le Huray
Remains of a 3.7cm anti aircraft gun Photo © Nick Le Huray
Photo © Nick Le Huray
Some of the older weapons on display. Photo © Nick Le Huray
Photo © Nick Le Huray
Photo © Nick Le Huray
Photo © Nick Le Huray
Photo © Nick Le Huray
Typical evidence of the German additions to existing fortifications. This is below one of the 3.7cm positions, Photo © Nick Le Huray
Photo © Nick Le Huray
Photo © Nick Le Huray
Photo © Nick Le Huray
Photo © Nick Le Huray
Photo © Nick Le Huray

Plenty of other blogs to see and details of places to visit either virtually or in person. Just look at the menus above. Thanks for reading.

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I will be adding more as time permits. Thank you for taking the time to read this, and I hope you enjoyed it. Please share it on social media or add a comment if you did. Feedback is always appreciated.

Also happy to be contacted with questions about the war in the Channel Islands, media appearances, podcasts etc.

© Nick Le Huray

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